Clean Energy Columbus Is Underway

Using clean energy from the wind and sun protects our health, and helps preserve the earth, air, and water for our families and future generations.

That’s the reason that the City of Columbus started Clean Energy Columbus!

Voters at the November 2020 election authorized this program for the City of Columbus.

Here’s how the program will work. The City buys electricity that’s generated from the sun and wind. The supplier flows that cleaner, greener electricity onto the Ohio power grid, and AEP Ohio continues to deliver it to customers over existing power lines. They’ll continue to maintain the lines and provide customer service and billings.

By bringing everyone together, the City can provide clean energy at competitive rates that won’t raise bills. And the program is always voluntary. Customers can opt-out at any time with no fees or penalties.

Columbus is known for being at the forefront of innovation, finding ways to do things better. And now we can all do our part to meet our city’s climate goals and create a healthy future with Clean Energy Columbus. We are extremely thankful that nearly 80 percent of Columbus voters this past November sided with innovation in approving this project.

To learn more about this effort and about the benefits of clean energy in Columbus, please go to CleanEnergyColumbus.org.

By Jeff Ortega

Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed urges you to Vote No on Columbus Issue 7

Issue 7 would divert 87 million in taxpayer dollars from the city into the pockets of a corporation whose interests are self-serving. Pro Energy Ohio, LLC, the group bringing Issue 7, has pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations and they have no business mishandling the city’s money.  While ‘green-washed’ language of Issue 7 sounds good, Pro Energy Ohio, LLC has not presented a plan on how the funds would be used, and they seek to operate without transparency or oversight. Issue 7 detracts from legitimate efforts to secure clean energy in Ohio. VOTE NO!

For more info, see The Columbus Dispatch’s editorial on issue 7.

The Threat of Coal-Tar Driveway and Parking Lot Sealants

photo of Brian Will

Brian Will

Rachel Carson in her seminal book “Silent Spring” raised public consciousness to the threat of commonly used chemicals such as DDT.  Since the 1962 publication of Carson’s book, society has become aware of many other products that threaten human health and the environment, including cigarettes, refrigerants, neonicotinoids, and asbestos. In the last twenty years, one chemical product that is alarming environmentalists is toxic coal-tar driveway and parking lot sealants, widely used in residential neighborhoods and strip mall parking lots in the Midwest.

Coal-tar sealants are primarily composed of coal-tar pitch, which has 1,000 times more carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) than an equally effective alternative product, asphalt-based sealants.  Asphalt-based sealants are widely available and similarly priced to coal-tar sealants and are a considerably less toxic.

Coal- tar sealant is a black, acrid-smelling goo that is spread on homeowner driveways and parking lots on warm days.  If you have ever walked near a newly sealed driveway and noticed the strong odor of mothballs, you probably were inhaling PAHs from the coal-tar fumes.  As coal-tar sealant is being poured and for years afterward, the carcinogenic PAHs present in the coal-tar gradually spread into the environment in the form of dust. Tires, snow shovels, leaf blowers, brooms, shoes, and bare feet can spread the poisonous dust into the environment as well as bring it inside homes.

The National Cancer Institute has classified coal-tar sealant as a Class 1 carcinogen, and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has determined that the PAH’s from coal-tar sealed driveway and parking lot runoff cause birth defects and death in fish, amphibians, and invertebrates.   Coal-tar sealants are so toxic that most nationwide home improvement retailers like Lowe’s, Ace, Home Depot, and TruValue no long sell them.  Thanks to education and advocacy by watershed organizations, many states have implemented bans or restrictions on the selling and application of coal-tar, including Minnesota, Washington, New York, Maryland, California, and Maine. Milwaukee, Washington, D.C., Ann Arbor, Austin, San Antonio, multiple suburbs of Chicago, and over hundred other cities and towns have banned coal-tar sealants.

Since coal-tar sealants are not usually available in retail stores, residents run the risk of being exposed to coal-tar when they hire contractors to seal their driveways. Residents can protect themselves and the environment by informing the contractor that they do not want coal-tar products, and ask for a copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MS-DS) of the product they intend to use. If the Chemical Abstract Number (CAS) for the product is 65996-93-2, then that contractor intends to use a coal-tar sealant.

You can learn more about the dangers of coal-tar sealants by visiting the USGS website.  There are also multiple helpful videos on YouTube.

Brian Will  bvwill@att.net

Support FLOW through our Milkweed Mania fundraiser!

In collaboration with Riverside Native Perennials, FLOW is hosting a milkweed sale. Milkweed is great for pollinators, and the butterflies will love you for it! We would love to see more of these native plants within the Lower Olentangy Watershed. The price is $12 per pot, containing 2-3 stems of milkweed. There are a variety of species available including Sullivant’s (Prairie), Whorled, Butterfly, Swamp, and Common.

Ready to order? Visit https://riversidenativeperennials.com/flow-fundraiser to order online. All orders must be picked up on Sunday, September 12th from 12PM-3PM at Sawmill Wetlands Education Area (2650 Sawmill Pl. Blvd., Columbus, OH 43235). Mark your calendars! Any orders not picked up during that time frame will be donated to a local greenspace area.

Please email us with any questions! info@olentangywatershed.org

Thank you for supporting FLOW and our Greenspace Implementation Plan!

The Dangers of Toxic Coal-Tar Driveway and Parking Lots Sealants to the Watershed

photo of Brian Will

Brian Will

Come Join FLOW as we return to our Outreach and Education Speaker Series on Tues., Sep. 14, 5:30-6:30 at Whetstone Library!  

Brian Will is an organizer of Sustainable Grandview, a grassroots, community-based citizens alliance in Grandview Heights dedicated to pursuing a cleaner and more environmentally friendly city.  He has been on the board of trustees of the Solid Waste Authority of Central Ohio (SWACO) since 2016 where he leads the Solid Waste Plan committee.  He is employed at the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center where he works in medical education and is a leader on the med center’s green team.

 

 

a freshly sealed driveway

As coal tar sealants degrade, their toxic particles are washed into the waterways and are tracked into our homes.

From a sustainability perspective, Brian’s primary interest is advocating for the protection of wildlife and natural habitat, especially native trees and plants, waterways and prairies.  To this end, he volunteers with Friends of Lower Olentangy Watershed, the Grange Audubon Center, Green Columbus, Citizens Climate Lobby, and the Sycamore Land Trust.

Brian has achieved household carbon neutrality with the help of rooftop solar panels, reducing household energy usage, diet and lifestyle changes and purchasing carbon offsets through Carbon Neutral Ohio.

In his role with Sustainable Grandview, Brian has written white papers and made presentations to the city council and mayor on various environmental topics, including the importance of tree canopies and the dangers of coal-tar driveway and parking lot sealants.  Brian will be discussing the latter, as toxic coal-tar represents a significant threat to humans as well as aquatic life in the watershed

Cleaning up Your Household’s ‘Carbon Trash’ and Becoming Carbon Neutral

OSU Wexner Medical Center’s Green Team Monthly Webinar Series presents:

Clean up Your Household’s ‘Carbon Trash’ and Become Carbon Neutral – with Daniel Poynter. 

Tuesday, Jul 20, 2021 12:00 PM Eastern Time (US and Canada)

About the speaker:

Daniel Poynter  founder @Carbon Neutral Ohio, one state chapter of a national grassroots movement
 
Daniel Poynter founded Carbon Neutral Indiana (CNI) in April 2020, and his non-profit organization is now expanding to other states, including Ohio (www.CarbonNeutralOhio.org). CNI helps households measure and clean up their carbon footprints. Along the way, they’ve demonstrated a self-financing, scalable social movement that can be expanded across other states. Before founding CNI, Daniel was a software engineer, professional advisor to 100+ social entrepreneurs, MacArthur Foundation Young Innovator, and speaker at 20 international academic institutions.