OSU Capstone: Cannon Drive relocation story map

The relocation of Cannon Drive is a project developed by the Ohio State University that aims to straighten and elevate Canon Drive to support future growth by creating 12 acres of developable land and serve as future flood protection for the surrounding area. Phase I occurred south of Herrick Bridge to King Avenue and increased the safety of the hospital area from 500 year elevation floods. Phase II is proposed to occur from Herrick Rd north to Lane Avenue. Further potential for future phases have been assessed all the way to Dodridge Rd. in order to increase entry and departure from campus.

This StoryMap is part of Ohio State’s School of Environment and Natural Resources Spring 2021 Senior Capstone project. The project was undertaken in collaboration with FLOW (Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed) to inform the organization and the public on various aspects of the Cannon Drive Relocation project. In the following StoryMap, we will discuss how the soil, river, and aquatic organisms that currently reside in the area will be impacted by the proposed construction plans and how to best mitigate negative impacts. We also analyze the potential for this site to facilitate recreation and educational opportunities to students and citizens alike.

Worthington Green Team’s Learn and Grow Series

Announcing The Green Team’s 2022 Learn and Grow Webinar Series

Join us the first Thursday of every month at 7:00 p.m. for our learn & grow 3.0 webinar series!

 

February 3rd – Being Conscious about your Closet

Did you know that a garbage truck’s worth of unwanted clothing is disposed of in US landfills every TWO MINUTES? The fashion industry is responsible for an astonishing 10% of global CO2 emissions each year. You can make a difference in your own closet. During this webinar we will share simple things you can be doing to be more conscious in your closet. We are also excited to welcome local Worthington business-owner, Amy Homan, who will share about her business Evolverie and why she chooses fabrics leftover from major fashion houses and designers for her apparel.

 

March 3rd- Learn all about Native Plants

What are native plants? Why should you be adding them to your yard? With special guest Sara Ernst, Conservation Implementation Specialist from Franklin Soil and Water Conservation District.


April 7th – Compost: Why, How and Where can you compost

Why, How, and Where can you compost? With our very own Sara Gallaugher of Full Circle Source / Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed (FLOW) and Joanne Dole, Master Gardener


Let’s include caring for our local environment on our list of resolutions

Welcome to 2022! This year let’s make resolutions that not only help us as individuals but also help our local watershed and environment. We all can work together to make this the best place possible for all. In 2021 the Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed helped pick up over 8 tons of trash and planted over 828 ball & burlap and containerized trees in the Lower Olentangy Watershed. Here are some great ways that you can personally make a difference at your home and in the community.

  • Pick up Litter
    Get a pair of gloves, a reusable bag and help pick up litter. You can do this by yourself, ask some friends or volunteer with a group. You could do this in your own neighborhood, at a local park or along a trail.
  • Storm Drains
    Only Rain should go down the Drain. Do you know that the storm drains along our streets go straight to a river? They do! Please keep all lawn chemicals, soaps, and oils from going down the storm drain. Remember nothing down the drain but the rain!
  • Plant Native Plants and Trees
    Why should we plant native plants and trees? Native plants and trees support our native wildlife, grow strong long roots to protect the soil and require less watering than grass. Check out FLOWOhio.org for more information about native Ohio plants.
  • Reduce, Reuse and Recycle Right
    According to SWACO, 76% of what goes to the Franklin County landfill could have been diverted and reused, recycled or composted. Check out SWACO’s website at recycleright.org for more great information on these important R’s.
  • Get involved in your Community by Volunteering
    Volunteer with a local organization that is working on sustainability initiatives. I work with the local nonprofit, Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed (FLOW). Their mission is to keep the Olentangy River and its tributaries clean and safe for all to enjoy, through public education, volunteer activities, and coordination with local decision-makers. FLOW is able to do the work it does because of its amazing volunteers and sponsors. Some of the ways you could be involved is by volunteering for a service event, such as native tree plantings, litter clean ups, invasive plant removals, planting pollinator gardens, and/or stream quality monitoring. To get involved with FLOW go to FLOWohio.org and follow them on social media. Another great way to get involved in your community is by joining or starting a neighborhood “Green Team”. Many communities have started a group focused on local sustainability initiatives. I’m personally part of the Worthington Partnership Green Team (@worthingtongreenteam).

There are a lot of additional ways you can make a difference. Go to FLOWohio.org to find out more and to learn about volunteer opportunities. I hope everyone has a safe & wonderful 2022!

Sara Gallaugher
FLOW Service Event Coordinator

This article appeared as a guest editorial in the Clintonville Spotlight for January 2022

OSU Capstone Projects providing valuable information for FLOW

On December 7th at the Nationwide & Ohio Farm Bureau 4-H Center OSU students from the School of Natural Resources in the College of Food Agriculture and Environmental Sciences presented their FLOW requested Capstone projects. The projects were titled as follows:

(click on the titles to see the posters summarizing the projects)

Allelopathy of Amur Honeysuckle and Management
Rachael Truman and Mike Puckettt


Environmental Education at Sawmill Wetlands
Lilla Dvoraczky, Brandon Flores, Jennifer Regrut, Tatiana Slesnick


Slyh Run Soil Restoration
Katie Baker, Erin Stewart, Izabelle Vose, Sydni Ward


Sawmill Wetlands Forest Assessment
Madison Drlik, Danielle Hutchison, Nick Neumeier


A Literature Review of Sustainable Urban Tree Management for Worthington Tree Nursery
Grace Beil, Anthony Suchan, Zijing Wang


Wildlife Survey Within the Urban Landscape
Gautam Apte, Nikolas Fuhrman, Kelsey Ridenour, Andrea Spurck, Eric Vermillion, Zach Whalen


We would like to thank Dr. Bill Peterman, Associate Professor in Wildlife Ecology and Management and all the students for their time and hard work. We’d also like to thank the FLOW volunteers that worked with these amazing students on their projects.

Clean Energy Columbus Is Underway

Using clean energy from the wind and sun protects our health, and helps preserve the earth, air, and water for our families and future generations.

That’s the reason that the City of Columbus started Clean Energy Columbus!

Voters at the November 2020 election authorized this program for the City of Columbus.

Here’s how the program will work. The City buys electricity that’s generated from the sun and wind. The supplier flows that cleaner, greener electricity onto the Ohio power grid, and AEP Ohio continues to deliver it to customers over existing power lines. They’ll continue to maintain the lines and provide customer service and billings.

By bringing everyone together, the City can provide clean energy at competitive rates that won’t raise bills. And the program is always voluntary. Customers can opt-out at any time with no fees or penalties.

Columbus is known for being at the forefront of innovation, finding ways to do things better. And now we can all do our part to meet our city’s climate goals and create a healthy future with Clean Energy Columbus. We are extremely thankful that nearly 80 percent of Columbus voters this past November sided with innovation in approving this project.

To learn more about this effort and about the benefits of clean energy in Columbus, please go to CleanEnergyColumbus.org.

By Jeff Ortega

Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed urges you to Vote No on Columbus Issue 7

Issue 7 would divert 87 million in taxpayer dollars from the city into the pockets of a corporation whose interests are self-serving. Pro Energy Ohio, LLC, the group bringing Issue 7, has pleaded guilty to campaign finance violations and they have no business mishandling the city’s money.  While ‘green-washed’ language of Issue 7 sounds good, Pro Energy Ohio, LLC has not presented a plan on how the funds would be used, and they seek to operate without transparency or oversight. Issue 7 detracts from legitimate efforts to secure clean energy in Ohio. VOTE NO!

For more info, see The Columbus Dispatch’s editorial on issue 7.