Monofilament Recycling Boxes

Monofilament recycling containerMonofilament Recycling Boxes
FLOW is installing dedicated boxes for recycling monofilament along waterways in the watershed. Monofilament can have serious negative environmental consequences if not recycled properly. It cannot be recycled along with other household plastics. Read on to learn why and how you should recycle monofilament.

What is monofilament?
This is the most common type of fishing line. As opposed to fishing line that is braided or made from multiple fibers, monofilament is made from a single strand. You have probably seen monofilament if you have ever gone fishing or been around fishermen. Unfortunately, if you like to walk by lakes or rivers, you have likely also seen discarded monofilament left along the banks.

What are the negative environmental impacts of monofilament?
It is not difficult to imagine how helpless wildlife can be against long durable plastic strings. When monofilament is left out in nature, fish, birds, and mammals can easily get entangled in it. It is thin and often clear, so it is difficult to see. Once an animal comes in contact with monofilament, survival can become difficult.

When monofilament wraps around a limb, it can impede walking or flying, or cause amputation. If the monofilament affects the animal’s ability to catch food or eat, the animal will likely die of starvation. Drowning, strangulation, and other serious injuries are also possible. Sometimes monofilament is accidentally ingested. Depending on the amount, the animals might not be able to pass through their digestive systems.

What is the proper way to recycle monofilament?
The only safe way to discard monofilament is to drop it in dedicated recycling boxes in parks or at participating tackle shops. The lines in these boxes are taken to special plants that have the capacity to recycle monofilament. Note that you should not put any braided or multi-string line in these boxes.

Monofilament cannot be recycled along with other household plastics. Due to its high-density, it requires a special recycling process.

Disposing of monofilament in a regular garbage bin does not solve the problem either. Wind can blow monofilament out of trash cans. In landfills, birds and scavengers looking for nest materials can pick it up. Monofilament is non-biodegradable and can last thousands of years, so it is important to make sure that it does not get into landfills to begin with.

What else can you do to help?
Here are some things you can do to keep monofilament away from wildlife.

If you like to go fishing, make sure to do the following:

1) Cast your line away from trees and other areas where it may get caught.

2) Check your line often to avoid unexpected breaks.

3) Never leave your line unattended.

4) Discard old monofilament line in proper boxes. 

5) Remove hooks from the monofilament line before recycling.

When you come across discarded monofilament in the parks – please pick it up and recycle it properly later. If you are eager to help even more – join a volunteer group to pick up monofilament along rivers and lakes.

Thank you for keeping our watershed safe for all!

Written by Sonya Afanasyeva 

 

The Olentangy Gap Trail Alignment 2 has been selected by Columbus Recreation and Parks

The City of Columbus Recreation and Parks Department has picked Alignment 2 for the Olentangy Trail “Gap” between Clinton Como Park and Northmoor Park.  Per our Capstone Team’s assessment, this was the least environmentally impactful alignment.  We will be losing trees and have more impervious surface in our 100 year floodplain (approximately 1.5 acres). No Stormwater Mitigation will be done on site unfortunately.

For details on the project (including public comments, all alternatives presented, and more) visit the Columbus Recreation & Parks site here.

A capstone team analyzed the 5 alternative plans for environmental and safety impacts and choose Alternative 2 as the most favorable of the 5. Their draft report can be read here: First Draft of Olentangy Trail Gap Assessment Report

Where and How to Fish the Olentangy River

Fishing the Olentangy Slides

Central Ohio native Michael Merz has been fishing since he was 8 years old. His mantra is “Think globally, fish locally!” A former officer of Ohio Smallmouth Alliance, Michael is a Wastewater Pretreatment Specialist for Columbus, where he performs Ohio EPA Stormwater and Wastewater compliance inspections within the city.
On April 2 Michael discussed where, how and why everyone in Columbus should fish the lower Olentangy River. The link above shows the slides Michael used. The topics include locating fish, “gradient controls”, dam removal projects and habitat improvement efforts, available species and distribution, inexpensive tackle setups and fishing from canoes/kayaks.

The Olentangy River through the Lens of George Anderson

Long time FLOW member and professional photographer George Anderson has been canoeing and photographing the Olentangy River for some time now. Come join FLOW as he shares his unique view of our river and some of the amazing wildlife that call it home. Be ready to enjoy some wonderful “eye candy” and surprising perspectives of a river most people never see.

We will have a RAFFLE for FLOW t-shirts, a COMPOSTER, and a few other prizes, and we would love for you to participate!

Refreshments and snacks will be provided.

When and Where:
Monday, March 7
7:15 PM – 8:30 PM
Veritas Community Church
345 E 2nd Ave, Columbus, Ohio 43201

Experiencing the Olentangy by Boat

Postcard of the Lake House at Olentangy Park, 1911.

Postcard of the Lake House at Olentangy Park, 1911.

Do you drive over the bridges of the Olentangy day after day and admire its beauty? Do you see kayakers and canoers? Have you ever wondered, “how can I do that?”

Lisa Daris, an urban environmental optimist and owner of Olentangy Paddle will be the guest lecturer at the next FLOW public meeting, Monday, February 1 at 7 pm (address below). Lisa will talk about experiencing the river in a boat! She will give pointers about where to put-in, where to take-out, and share insights about the wildlife and changing health of the Olentangy.

We will have a RAFFLE for FLOW shirts and a few other prizes, and we would love for you to participate!

Refreshments and snacks will be provided. Please let us know if you intend to make it out!

When and Where:
Monday, February 1
7:15 PM – 8:30 PM

Veritas Community Church
345 E 2nd Ave, Columbus, Ohio 43201