How to Plant a Tree, and Why

*Article and Photos by Adrien  DeLapp

October 2018, FLOW planted more than 100 trees between a variety of schools, including Gables, Maize, and Salem Elementary as well as Hamilton Stem Academy. Against all odds (cold, rain, and mud) these tree plantings were a success thanks to the efforts of Nisource, the Columbus Young Professionals, and other volunteers.

 The transition from summer to fall is beautiful to witness. During this time of year, the temperature is comfortable and the leaves take on a spectrum of warm hues. However, late August to the end of October is also the optimal time to plant trees. One reason why is that the air is cooler than the soil this time of year. This encourages root growth without top growth, thus young trees are able to develop a sturdy root system before growing upward. Additionally, the moderate temperature and fall rain help the tree to hold in moisture, reduce the risk of it undergoing heat stress, and give it the required support to grow during the spring season. While some trees are easiest to grow in the spring, for many deciduous trees fall is the best time to plant.

    Once a person knows what season to start planting, they’re going to need some tools to prepare. Assuming they’ve got a hole and a tree already, they’ll need a shovel, wire cutters, stakes, a stake pounder, and tree tie. Also, they should make sure that they’ve got 2 or 3 other people helping out, as even the smallest trees can have heavy root balls. The first step FLOW volunteers take when planting trees is removing any plastic ties or sacks on the trunk. Next, volunteers carefully roll the tree into the hole. After that, it’s time to cut the burlap sack covering the root ball. Volunteers use a wire cutter to remove the wire from outside of the sack, then remove the nails holding the sack together. After this, it is safe to bury the burlap sack along with the tree. Once the soil is distributed so as to fill in the hole, it’s time to mulch the tree. It is important to make sure to pull back the soil and mulch from the base of the tree trunk so that the root ball is exposed, as this helps the roots to absorb water and exchange necessary gases with the environment. Now it’s time to stake. Staking is done by pulling a stake pounder over the head and then ramming it over a stake. This is best done using your body weight to propel the pounder unto the stake. It is helpful to use the two stakes to straighten out the tree, if necessary. Finally, the tree should be tied to the stakes. Knots should be tight and wrapped around the grooves in the stakes so as to reduce the risk of the tie slipping. It is recommended that the planter leave extra tie so that there is enough to retie the tree if the knots come undone. Lastly, safely dispose of all waste, including any plastic, extra burlap, wire, or nails. After this process, the first steps have been taken towards planting a tree that will benefit the environment, the neighborhood, and the lives of individuals for years to come.

Five Reasons to Plant a Tree:

  1. Trees Absorb and Release into the Environment

This not only helps people to breathe, but in the long run, helps to combat climate change.

  1. Trees Improve Air and Water Quality

Trees absorb pollutants in the air and reduce runoff. Trees also reduce evaporation on shady lawns and release moisture into the air.

  1. Trees Reduce the Temperature

This helps keep the city cool on hot summer days and decreases the amount of energy used on air conditioning.

  1. Trees Increase Property Values

Trees can increase the property value of a neighborhood and attract business traffic.

  1. Trees Improve Health

It has been proven that trees help sick or injured people to heal. Trees are also good for mental health and well-being and help to reduce violence.

Happy Planting,

FLOW

We Did It! The Bridge to Cranbrook Elementary

Together we raised $7800 to build a bridge to Cranbrook Elementary in partnership with The Columbus Foundation. These funds combined with the funds that were already raised will be enough to build the bridge.

Thank you to all of our generous donors for supporting this project. It means so much to the Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed (FLOW) and the Cranbrook Community. Now we can get ready to break ground on the pedestrian bridge over Slyh Run, reconnecting the surrounding neighborhood to Cranbrook Elementary School and a 10-acre outdoor classroom of restored woods and prairie. We will be providing more information about the project as the plans start coming together!

We are better together!

Better Together: A Bridge to Cranbrook Elementary

                                        

We’re Almost There! 

In the next 4 weeks we are hoping to fund this year long project to connect a community! Your gift will install a 52-foot-long fiberglass pedestrian bridge over Slyh Run, reconnecting the surrounding neighborhood to Cranbrook Elementary School and a 10-acre outdoor classroom of restored woods and prairie. Teachers, students, and families are ready to utilize the woods, stream, and prairie for their outdoor education laboratory and as a safe route to school. Gifts and grants to this project have already raised $35,000 toward a $43,000 goal! Help us close the gap and build a bridge to Cranbrook Elementary! Click here to donate now or text B11442 to 614-230-0347 to link directly to Columbus Foundation’s giving platform!

 

 

Twenty Years of Progress

Celebration day, FLOW-style: FLOW and Anheuser-Busch folks started the day by planting a pollinator garden.

FLOW has now had twenty years of organizing, planning, planting, measuring and otherwise looking after the quality and safety of the Olentangy River.

You can see the results all around. Some of the important accomplishments:

  • Completing the Watershed Action Plan – only meant to be a five year plan, but still used today as a roadmap for the future. This entailed many meetings that got the community involved and connected with the river.
  • Improving water quality as a result of four dam removals.
  • Getting the Lower Olentangy Water Trail approved, which gives paddlers access points to the river and encourages enjoyment of the river and the natural areas around it.
  • Planting trees and native wildflowers all over the watershed, to provide habitat, reduce polluting runoff, and offer outdoor enjoyment for all.

It started in 1997 when Amanda Davey, just finishing at The Ohio State University, saw an article about watershed coordinators. She contacted the Ohio EPA and thus began the steps that formed Friends of the Lower Olentangy.

Using Amanda’s OSU contacts and Vince Mazika’s EPA contacts, the original email got an enormous response. They formalized the group as a 501c3 non-profit, set up a board of directors, put together a mission, and began monthly meetings with educational and business topics.

The early founders envisioned an organization that would be a clearinghouse for the river, and sustainable over the years. The decision was made to work together with partners rather than serve in an adversarial role.

“I am so impressed with what FLOW has done and how it has maintained itself, Amanda says. “The city uses the river as an asset now. The water quality is maintaining, which is good with all the development pressure up north.”

A grant allowed the group to hire Erin Miller as its first watershed coordinator. She served from 2000-2004, when the organizational foundations were established, membership was built, and the watershed plan was completed.

“Working for FLOW was one of the highlights of my career,” Erin says. “The board members are extremely involved, and always have been. They did GIS mapping, took photos that brought the river to life, helped with financial expertise.”

“It has always been a very reputable group, one that is science based and community focused. FLOW’s vision is for the community to be connected to an appreciative of the Olentangy River,” Erin explains.

Among the core group that started FLOW, and now enjoying the 20th anniversary: George Anderson, Joanne Leussig, Amanda Davey, Jennifer Fish, Russ Fish, Joe Motil.

Grow with the FLOW

 

One of the many ways we are aiming to enhance the health of the Olentangy Watershed is through campaigning for the planting of native trees! Our goal is to partner with the Olentangy Watershed community and have everyone planting and caring for trees. We hope to accomplish this by providing education, ensuring you live in the Olentangy Watershed, and offering free native trees and shrubs. To claim a FREE TREE, please go to the registration page by clicking HERE or by clicking “Grow with the FLOW” above. Registration is open through March 29th, 2019.

      

FLOW maintains an Urban Tree Nursery growing a variety of species for a free giveaway and planting within the Olentangy Watershed. Our next giveaway will be hosted March 30th, 2019.

Species below are growing at the Urban Nursery and are linked to ODNR’s forestry website for more information: