Nature’s Gliders: Flying Squirrels

Flying Squirrel in flight to bird feeder.

Flying to bird feeder. Photo courtesy of Gregory Turner, USDA

Nature’s Gliders: Flying Squirrels

Free Public Meeting May 7 at 7 p.m.
Please note new location:
Columbus Metropolitan Library – Northside Branch, 1423 N. High Street, Columbus, OH
Please join us for this free public presentation and discussion.
OSU Extension Wildlife Program Specialist Marne A. Titchenell will introduce us to the life and habitat of the flying squirrel and other Ohio squirrels. Attendees will learn how to attract flying squirrels to their backyards, as well as tips and plans for constructing and mounting flying squirrel nest boxes.

Sponsored by Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed

 

Attracting Wildlife to Your Property

Attracting Wildlife

Emilee R. Hardesty, Private Lands Biologist with Ohio DNR Division of Wildlife, discussed changes you can make to attract pollinators to your yard spoke at the March 2017 FLOW public meeting. Many pollinators are in decline, but there are simple things you can do at home to make your yard a friendly place for pollinators. Slides from her presentation are at the link above.

Where and How to Fish the Olentangy River

Fishing the Olentangy Slides

Central Ohio native Michael Merz has been fishing since he was 8 years old. His mantra is “Think globally, fish locally!” A former officer of Ohio Smallmouth Alliance, Michael is a Wastewater Pretreatment Specialist for Columbus, where he performs Ohio EPA Stormwater and Wastewater compliance inspections within the city.
On April 2 Michael discussed where, how and why everyone in Columbus should fish the lower Olentangy River. The link above shows the slides Michael used. The topics include locating fish, “gradient controls”, dam removal projects and habitat improvement efforts, available species and distribution, inexpensive tackle setups and fishing from canoes/kayaks.

Better Together: A Bridge to Cranbrook Elementary

                                        

We’re Almost There! 

In the next 4 weeks we are hoping to fund this year long project to connect a community! Your gift will install a 52-foot-long fiberglass pedestrian bridge over Slyh Run, reconnecting the surrounding neighborhood to Cranbrook Elementary School and a 10-acre outdoor classroom of restored woods and prairie. Teachers, students, and families are ready to utilize the woods, stream, and prairie for their outdoor education laboratory and as a safe route to school. Gifts and grants to this project have already raised $35,000 toward a $43,000 goal! Help us close the gap and build a bridge to Cranbrook Elementary! Click here to donate now or text B11442 to 614-230-0347 to link directly to Columbus Foundation’s giving platform!

 

 

Webster Park History

Jeff Caswell of Friends of Webster Park

by Lucy Caswell

The area now known as the Webster Park subdivision was sold to Amason Webster (not “Amazon,” despite the street name) by the Rathbone heirs on May 29, 1846.  Webster’s daughter Orell inherited the land upon his death in 1900.  In 1909 she and her husband Lewis Legg subdivided the land, and the initial plat shows “Webster Park” at the 1.8 acre site now bounded by North Delta Drive, East Delta Drive, Webster Park Avenue and Olentangy Boulevard (the entire subdivision runs from High Street to Olentangy Boulevard, and from Erie Road to the edge of Whetstone Park).  

The City Bulletin of May 8, 1926 records the transfer of this park plot to the city: ”Whereas, the tract…has been preserved in its natural state and protected as a wild bird asylum and wild flower preserve and it is well suited and adapted for such purposes…the same is hereby set aside…as a wild bird asylum and wild flower preserve.   …The superintendent of parks…is hereby directed to maintain and protect the same as nearly as possible in its native state…”  Columbus Recreation and Parks Department is the city’s administrative unit responsible for Webster Park today.

The provision that the park must be maintained in its “native state” means that, insofar as possible, it should be left alone to allow the native species to follow their natural progression.  For example, naturally fallen trees in Webster Park remain where they land, to decay and provide shelter for small animals.  The city must provide special permission before any plants can be removed from or added to the park.  

For many years, neighbors kept the park litter-free by picking up refuse when they saw it and by organizing occasional clean-up days within the park.  In recent years, growth of invasive plants such as euonymus (wintercreeper), English ivy, Asian honeysuckles, and garlic mustard changed the ecosystem of the park significantly.   As a result, the volunteer group Friends of Webster Park was organized in 2005 to remove invasive plants under the supervision of the Recreation and Parks Department, and generally to protect and care for this natural area.  In 2014 the city’s Nature Preserve Advisory Council voted to name Webster Park as a Nature Preserve.

In the years since the Friends began work, the park has seen a resurgence of wildflowers that had been smothered by the groundcovers, many trees have been saved from damage by removing invasive vines, and the native bushes are thriving with less competition from honeysuckle.  One of the park’s outstanding features is the wetland on its west end, unique because it hosts one of Ohio’s very few stands of skunk cabbage.

Twenty Years of Progress

Celebration day, FLOW-style: FLOW and Anheuser-Busch folks started the day by planting a pollinator garden.

FLOW has now had twenty years of organizing, planning, planting, measuring and otherwise looking after the quality and safety of the Olentangy River.

You can see the results all around. Some of the important accomplishments:

  • Completing the Watershed Action Plan – only meant to be a five year plan, but still used today as a roadmap for the future. This entailed many meetings that got the community involved and connected with the river.
  • Improving water quality as a result of four dam removals.
  • Getting the Lower Olentangy Water Trail approved, which gives paddlers access points to the river and encourages enjoyment of the river and the natural areas around it.
  • Planting trees and native wildflowers all over the watershed, to provide habitat, reduce polluting runoff, and offer outdoor enjoyment for all.

It started in 1997 when Amanda Davey, just finishing at The Ohio State University, saw an article about watershed coordinators. She contacted the Ohio EPA and thus began the steps that formed Friends of the Lower Olentangy.

Using Amanda’s OSU contacts and Vince Mazika’s EPA contacts, the original email got an enormous response. They formalized the group as a 501c3 non-profit, set up a board of directors, put together a mission, and began monthly meetings with educational and business topics.

The early founders envisioned an organization that would be a clearinghouse for the river, and sustainable over the years. The decision was made to work together with partners rather than serve in an adversarial role.

“I am so impressed with what FLOW has done and how it has maintained itself, Amanda says. “The city uses the river as an asset now. The water quality is maintaining, which is good with all the development pressure up north.”

A grant allowed the group to hire Erin Miller as its first watershed coordinator. She served from 2000-2004, when the organizational foundations were established, membership was built, and the watershed plan was completed.

“Working for FLOW was one of the highlights of my career,” Erin says. “The board members are extremely involved, and always have been. They did GIS mapping, took photos that brought the river to life, helped with financial expertise.”

“It has always been a very reputable group, one that is science based and community focused. FLOW’s vision is for the community to be connected to an appreciative of the Olentangy River,” Erin explains.

Among the core group that started FLOW, and now enjoying the 20th anniversary: George Anderson, Joanne Leussig, Amanda Davey, Jennifer Fish, Russ Fish, Joe Motil.

Grow with the FLOW

 

One of the many ways we are aiming to enhance the health of the Olentangy Watershed is through campaigning for the planting of native trees! Our goal is to partner with the Olentangy Watershed community and have everyone planting and caring for trees. We hope to accomplish this by providing education, ensuring you live in the Olentangy Watershed, and offering free native trees and shrubs. To claim a FREE TREE, please go to the registration page by clicking HERE or by clicking “Grow with the FLOW” above. Registration is open through March 29th, 2019.

      

FLOW maintains an Urban Tree Nursery growing a variety of species for a free giveaway and planting within the Olentangy Watershed. Our next giveaway will be hosted March 30th, 2019.

Species below are growing at the Urban Nursery and are linked to ODNR’s forestry website for more information: