BioBlitz at Preservation Park September 7th and 8th

Bioblitz will be held at Dear Haven Park and will aim to record all living things in the study area including, fungi, trees, wildflowers, mammals, bats, birds, reptiles, amphibians, insects, spiders and other macro-invertebrates. Experts will lead survey hikes in the prairie, forest and wetland areas.

Members of the public are invited to join the BioBlitz Friday, Sept. 7, noon-midnight, and Saturday, Sept. 8, 8 a.m.-noon.  No reservation required.

Location:  Dear Haven Park 4183 Liberty Rd N, Powell, OH 43065

Schedule:

Friday, September 7

12:00 Bio blitz Kickoff

1:00 Geology

2:00 Fungi

3:00 Reptile survey (flipping mats or metal)

4:00 Dragonfly/Damselfly hike, Macro invertebrates

5:00 Fish shocking/seining

6:00 Spider Collection

7:00 Turtle program

8:00 Frog Calls

9:00 Bat Calls

10:00 Moth spotlight

Saturday, September 8

8:00 Bird Mist Netting/Bird Hike

9:00 Mammals (traps)

10:00 Worm charming, Herbaceous and woody plants

11:00 Insect, spider ID

12:00 Bio blitz Overview and Wrap Up

 

Attracting Wildlife to Your Property

Attracting Wildlife

Emilee R. Hardesty, Private Lands Biologist with Ohio DNR Division of Wildlife, discussed changes you can make to attract pollinators to your yard spoke at the March 2017 FLOW public meeting. Many pollinators are in decline, but there are simple things you can do at home to make your yard a friendly place for pollinators. Slides from her presentation are at the link above.

Better Together: A Bridge to Cranbrook Elementary

                                        

We’re Almost There! 

In the next 4 weeks we are hoping to fund this year long project to connect a community! Your gift will install a 52-foot-long fiberglass pedestrian bridge over Slyh Run, reconnecting the surrounding neighborhood to Cranbrook Elementary School and a 10-acre outdoor classroom of restored woods and prairie. Teachers, students, and families are ready to utilize the woods, stream, and prairie for their outdoor education laboratory and as a safe route to school. Gifts and grants to this project have already raised $35,000 toward a $43,000 goal! Help us close the gap and build a bridge to Cranbrook Elementary! Click here to donate now or text B11442 to 614-230-0347 to link directly to Columbus Foundation’s giving platform!

 

 

Webster Park History

Jeff Caswell of Friends of Webster Park

by Lucy Caswell

The area now known as the Webster Park subdivision was sold to Amason Webster (not “Amazon,” despite the street name) by the Rathbone heirs on May 29, 1846.  Webster’s daughter Orell inherited the land upon his death in 1900.  In 1909 she and her husband Lewis Legg subdivided the land, and the initial plat shows “Webster Park” at the 1.8 acre site now bounded by North Delta Drive, East Delta Drive, Webster Park Avenue and Olentangy Boulevard (the entire subdivision runs from High Street to Olentangy Boulevard, and from Erie Road to the edge of Whetstone Park).  

The City Bulletin of May 8, 1926 records the transfer of this park plot to the city: ”Whereas, the tract…has been preserved in its natural state and protected as a wild bird asylum and wild flower preserve and it is well suited and adapted for such purposes…the same is hereby set aside…as a wild bird asylum and wild flower preserve.   …The superintendent of parks…is hereby directed to maintain and protect the same as nearly as possible in its native state…”  Columbus Recreation and Parks Department is the city’s administrative unit responsible for Webster Park today.

The provision that the park must be maintained in its “native state” means that, insofar as possible, it should be left alone to allow the native species to follow their natural progression.  For example, naturally fallen trees in Webster Park remain where they land, to decay and provide shelter for small animals.  The city must provide special permission before any plants can be removed from or added to the park.  

For many years, neighbors kept the park litter-free by picking up refuse when they saw it and by organizing occasional clean-up days within the park.  In recent years, growth of invasive plants such as euonymus (wintercreeper), English ivy, Asian honeysuckles, and garlic mustard changed the ecosystem of the park significantly.   As a result, the volunteer group Friends of Webster Park was organized in 2005 to remove invasive plants under the supervision of the Recreation and Parks Department, and generally to protect and care for this natural area.  In 2014 the city’s Nature Preserve Advisory Council voted to name Webster Park as a Nature Preserve.

In the years since the Friends began work, the park has seen a resurgence of wildflowers that had been smothered by the groundcovers, many trees have been saved from damage by removing invasive vines, and the native bushes are thriving with less competition from honeysuckle.  One of the park’s outstanding features is the wetland on its west end, unique because it hosts one of Ohio’s very few stands of skunk cabbage.

The Big Give is May 12 – Amplify your generosity to FLOW

The Big Give is a 24-hour online giving rally to benefit community nonprofits. Show your community spirit and support the Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed (FLOW) online using PowerPhilanthropy.® A record $1.3 million Bonus Pool will amplify giving on a pro rata basis.  This means that everyone who gives will have their donation(s) increased based on the total amount raised during The Big Give.

All major credit cards, with a minimum donation of $20, are accepted. All credit card fees are covered by The Columbus Foundation— so 100 percent of Big Give donations go to FLOW.

It’s easy to participate!

1. CLICK on The Big Give banner when you visit columbusfoundation.org, beginning at 10:00 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, May 12. SELECT Friends of the Lower Olentangy Watershed.

2. GIVE securely using a major credit card, with a minimum of $20. Columbus Foundation donors can also make a grant (minimum of $100) through their Donor Advised Fund or Supporting Foundation.

3. CELEBRATE, knowing that you are strengthening our community for all! Share your experience and why you gave, and follow The Big Give at #BigGiveTCF.

The funds raised during The Big Give will support FLOW’s mission to educate residents about how they can help protect the Olentangy for future generations.